Entreprenuers – See How Public Speaking Helps Your Marketing Plan

entrepreneur, public speaking, market plan

Public Speaking an Important Key to Being an Entrepreneur

If you’re in business, this article will motivate you to be a public speaker. Public speaking can and should become a part of every entrepreneur’s marketing plan. Often, the entrepreneur focuses time on building their business by talking to people one-on-one. It is equally important to talk to larger groups of people via public speaking for three key reasons.  Click here to read the article about Public Speaking and Entrepreneurs.

Public Speaking and Customer Service – How do these work hand in hand?

Old World Public Speaking and Customer Service

An Immigrant
Public Speaking and
Customer Service

My Grandfather had an uncanny way of using public speaking and customer service to take care of his patrons.  In a moment of nostalgia, I thought back to all we can learn from what my Grandfather had to teach us.  What do you do to take care of your clients and customers?  Here’s an article for you to read called Pubic Speaking, Customer Service and The Cigar Store.

During a business presentation, how would you go the extra mile?

Business Presentations

Business Presentations and Selling

Here’s a great story about a professional who went the extra mile during a business presentation.  What tips have worked for you?  When you read this article on business presentations, let me know if ysou have ever done anything like the professional in the article.     http://lindablackman.com/the-realtor-the-business-presentation-and-the-follow-up/

Public Speaking and Heartfelt Truth

Miracle of Speaking Heartfelt Truth

Speak from heart
Speak your truth

Now Maybe Finally™:  The Miracle of Speaking Truth

I want to share with you how someone named Naomi benefited from a conversation we had and the heart-felt observations she made that will help all of us.  Her moving observations will be inspirational whether we are public speaking, handling a relationship issue or simply walking our talk in life each day.

Naomi wrote this grateful e-mail to me:  “Thank God for the many angels that surround us. I had several setbacks including injuring my dominant arm that kept me from work for four months and the resulting financial strain. Several friends had family members pass away creating an emotional roller coaster as I was recovering from grieving for my father. As a participant in a weekly mastermind phone conference, I found myself needing more support to move forward. I was not fully present in the call, and proceeded to mention that I had a difficult time creating a title for my professional speaker services, but provided something off the top of my head.”

Note that Naomi is a dynamic woman with phenomenal insights to help others move forward with self-esteem issues and allow them to live the life they have always dreamed of living.  Yet, I knew she couldn’t create a title for her talk because of a limiting belief that was holding her back and I knew that limiting belief would prevent her from being effective.

Naomi went on to say:  “As I was speaking, Linda extended an invitation to call her after our session. That call let me see my life in a way I had not seen before. She asked me to share a memory that was making me now feel the way I had felt another time. I didn’t have to think long, because a recent exchange with a co-worker immediately came to mind. She asked when I felt that way before and the light came on as she pointed out the pattern of behavior.  I talked about a disturbing email from my manager while on medical leave, the end of my marriage, and even the loss of my dad. As I cried and Linda listened, I felt the heaviness of my heart being lifted. I was not aware of how each time something happened with a relationship, I had withdrawn thinking I was not good enough.

Linda asked me to write the following which transformed me in the process:

1)    I am not responsible for any impropriety that someone else performed on another individual.

2)    I am not responsible for anyone else’s responses except my own.

3)   I, Naomi, accept the responsibility that I have a powerful message to share with those who are ready to hear it… As soon as I am ready to let go of what’s been holding me back.”

At this point, I asked Naomi to write what was in her heart, not what I asked.  Naomi wrote from her heart:

4)   “I am ready to let go –1000 percent!

5)    I am giving myself permission to follow my heart.

6)    I am willing to open my heart again because an open heart is the source of love.

7)    I accept responsibility to lead and grow.

8)    I am a student learning to embrace the next part of my journey.

9)    I am open to receive love and support.

10)  I release the shame of failure, I am a winner.

  1. I allow myself to speak what I know without comparing to others.
  2. I accept my unique gifts and share them with the world.
  3. I accept love and support for my vision.
  4. I am not giving up on me.

The amazing part about this conversation is that we did not know each other, but after the call, I felt like Linda knew my inner soul essence.”

I don’t always know how people hear of my services. They have heard me speak, have read this column, heard about me via television, radio, teleseminars and social media.  Although I’m always interested in how they find me, I am more interested in helping them become the speakers they want to be to get their messages and gifts out into the world.

Today’s LINDAism:  Limiting beliefs truly prevent us from moving forward.   NOW, MAYBE, FINALLY we can all move forward by identifying what holds us back and continue life with all the grace and dignity we are each meant to have.

Linda Blackman, CSP, is an award-winning broadcast journalist, co-author of THE SALES COACH, has articles in numerous publications and is one of 578 people worldwide who is a Certified Speaking Professional. Utilize Linda’s expertise to help you and your company with public speaking, how to handle the media, crisis communications and selling more effectively.  Reach Linda at Linda@LindaBlackman.com, www.LindaBlackman.com or at The Executive Image International, LLC at 239-777-1776.

Please click here if you’d like to download a copy of this article.

 

 

Body Language, Public Speaking and Pregnancy

Linda the day before giving birth to her daughter

Body Language and Pregnancy

I often use the picture to the left when talking with people about body language. You are looking at a picture of me the day before I gave birth to my beautiful daughter.

Stay tuned for further details about this picture and body language.

Coming across as confident in your conversation and body language — the result will make others feel comfortable with you.  Being aware of your body language and others is like knowing a foreign language.  A language that when understood, helps you read your clients and audiences better.

Here’s a case in point.  Most people say when you cross your arms, it means you’re on the defensive.  That may or may not be true depending on circumstances.

When you take a look at me in my ninth month of pregnancy, you’ll notice that I’m holding the fireplace with my right arm raised to hold onto the fireplace with my hand – probably attempting to stay balanced.  And, my left arm is by my left side.

Being pregnant, only 5 feet tall and tipping the scale at almost two hundred pounds, I could not find many suitable positions for my arms.

There were only two spots of comfort for my arms:  1) to put my hands by the side of my body in some fashion; 2) to cross my arms in front of chest resting them on my big baby belly.

When speaking to groups and clients about body language, I like to use this picture to make this point:  for some people, like pregnant women, they cross their arms not to be on the defensive, they just don’t have too many places to put their arms.

When it comes to body language, it’s important to look at people’s gestures in context of what is going on.

When I work with clients and do speaking engagements, we discuss body language at length; how to read others; how to read yours; how to adapt your body language to what you are observing to ease any tension and move in the positive direction you want.  Good public speakers incorporate appropriate body language and gestures into their public speaking.

At the moment I am writing this blog to you, there is currently a free-book ($19.95 value) I’m giving away on my website called 15 Ways Small Talk Can Benefit Your BU$INE$$.  The above is an excerpt from that book.  If you’d like your free copy of 15 Ways Small Talk Can Benefit Your BU$INE$$, please go to my website and put your name and email address in the opt-in box at www.LindaBlackman.com.

Body Language and Presidential Politics

Governor Romney

Politics and Body Language

Body language is in the news more than ever with the presidential election upon us and in the aftermath of the presidential debates.  Good public speaking embraces appropriate and consistent body language.  President Obama and Governor Romney make every effort to speak the right words and use the right body language.

Public Speaking and Politics

Public Speaking and Politics

There is substance and there is style . Having substance and style is the ideal.

However, you can’t have the right style unless you have the right body language.

Many an election has been won or lost depending upon the candidate’s body language. To keep this blog posting fair and balanced, I will not talk about a specific candidate’s body language. Rather, I’ll provide  some important guidelines which will give you easy tools to analyze body language in general, as well as your own body language during casual conversations and in business presentations.

Coming across as confident in your conversation and body language will result in making others feel more comfortable with you.

Throughout the election, pay close attention to the gestures of each candidate. First, consider each of the following gestures on their own.  Then I’ll share with you the concept of “gesture clusters.” Consider … Rapid eye blinking generally means someone is uncomfortable and/or not telling the truth. Rubbing one’s nose while speaking, can indicate uncertainty. If the candidate is saying he has the ability to improve the economy and simultaneously his shoulders shrug – you can be almost guaranteed that he does not have confidence in what he is saying – which translates into those watching not feeling comfortable either. If a candidate looks at his watch, it may be interpreted that he can’t wait to leave the venue.  We give our own interpretations to a candidate’s gestures.

Considering the above, there’s always the possibility that the candidate may have gotten a piece of dust in his eye causing the rapid eye blinking; maybe the candidate genuinely has a nose with an itch and is rubbing his nose for that reason; maybe the candidate is shrugging his shoulders to release a muscle spasm in his back;  maybe the candidate’s watch is feeling too tight on his wrist so he glances down at the watch to wish the pain away.  All possibilities.  However, from a plausibility stand point, each of these gestures generally stand on their own as telling a truth through gesturing versus the words being spoken.

If each of the gestures mentioned are happening simultaneously, then we have gesture clusters.  If the candidate’s words are not in alignment with his body language, then within a given moment we could easily see rapid eye blinking; the rubbing of his nose; the shrugging of his shoulders; his eyes looking at his watch.

Body language is truly a powerful secret language when you study it.  During this election and in your daily life, become a student of body language … your success and powers of perception will abound.

More on body language in the next post.

 

 

 

Sales Presentations, Public Speaking and the Question and Answer Segment

Keep track of your time during the questions and answer segment when public speaking

Giving a Presentation
How to Make Sure You Run on Time

Here’s a quick case study.  Picture the audience to the left listening to John.  John has to give a brief 20 minute sales presentation about a new product to his sales team.  John forgot to take something important into consideration and ran way over on his allotted amount of time to speak and as a result got raked over the coals by his vice president of sales.

Here’s what happened to John.  Be aware of what John learned will help you too in your various presentations.  John was told by his company president that his presentation time must include the question and answer segment.  Every time someone asks you a question, it will take you 1 to 5 minutes to have someone ask that question and for you to respond.  During most presentations, audience members typically ask about three questions when given the opportunity.  John spoke for 20 minutes, and then took questions.  He ran over by ten minutes due to his q and a session running long and really upset his boss.  John learned his lesson the hard way.  Please remember that part of Signature Speaking™ is to factor in time for q and a.  Doing so will help you stay on time and be respectful of other people’s time too.

Your image while public speaking will make or break you

Keep track of your time during the questions and answer segment when public speaking

Giving a Presentation
Prepare for the Question and Answer Segment

There are many parts to making a good solid, content-based, heart-centered business presentation, sales presentation or for any type of public speaking … whether addressing a group, client or customer.  I’ll be sharing how-to’s you can use on a regular basis here.  So check back frequently.

Please remember, the question and answer segment is often a part of any presentation.  You need to prepare for questions you anticipate from a given audience, client or customer and how you will respond.  Always right down at least three questions expect to be asked and practice your responses. Doing so makes you come across as speaking like a pro and is part of Signature Speaking™.  Check back here for an important Signature Speaking™ tip about how much time to devote to questions and answers in your various presentations.  Your image will suffer if you come across as being unprepared or unknowing in your responses to questions – now you can avoid letting that happen by anticipating questions and practicing your responses.